What’s Important to Your Customers?

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As a copywriter, it’s my job to create copy that connects with customers and makes them realize the company they’re dealing with truly understands their needs. The problem is that most companies don’t really know what their customers need. They don’t understand what’s important to their customers. They think they do. They think by shoving the features of their products or services down the customers’ throats that they’ll earn their business, but more times than not, this doesn’t work.

Why?

Most importantly, the features of your product typically aren’t all that different from those of the competition. Just compare your copy to that of your competition. Odds are, you’re focusing on the same features and benefits as everyone else. As a result, you’re indistinguishable. Ordinary. Average.

The way to truly stand out is to understand what your customers really care about…not what you think they care about. How can you do this?

  • Take a look at your testimonials and reviews—One of the best things about testimonials is they give you insight into what exactly it is about your products and services that customers appreciate so much. Same thing goes for negative reviews; these allow you to see what your shortcomings are and what needs you aren’t meeting. While you’re at it, read the testimonials and reviews of your competition too. The more of these you read, the better you’ll understand your target audience.
  • Talk to your customer service representatives–These are your front line warriors who deal with customers on a regular basis. Talk to them to learn what customers are really looking for. Try to identify common questions asked by customers, obstacles that stop customers from buying, and sales points that get them excited enough to make a purchase.
  • Monitor the social networks—I see social networks differently than most people I deal with. While others are talking about “joining the conversation” and some are desperately trying to figure out how to monetize their social media presence, I see Twitter, Facebook, and other sites as an enormous resource for learning more about your audience. You can see how they talk, how they talk about your products, what’s important to them, their likes and dislikes, and so much more. This can be very useful when creating your marketing message.
  • Surveys—These can be sent to customers after they make a purchase as well as to lost customers who’ve decided against doing business with you. Keep surveys short and to the point, and design them so that you can learn more about what your audience really cares about.

Take a look at your copy. Does it really address what’s important to your customers?

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